which is better truvia or sweet-n-low?
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So I was told that Truvia is better than Sweet n Low, because of the aspartame.. any thoughts on this? Anyone have a study proving or disproving this? My great grandparents loved Sweet n Low, and there were never any health problems relating to that with them.. any thoughts?

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1

I have attached a few links from credible sites like my personal go-to & favorite, The Mayo Clinic, FDA, National Cancer Institute, Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Science in the Public Interest & even a couple .coms like LiveStrong that have some great, pertinent information.

Here’s the deal; there have been studies linking certain artificial sweeteners to cancer, increased trunk & belly fat, intestinal issues, digestion issues, allergy issues, etc, but at the end of the day, I personally feel moderation is key as a good portion of the studies were based on the subject matter consuming the sweetener in high quantities (some as high as the subject’s body weight).

The Truvias, Stevias, etc are popping up everywhere with the tag of a natural alternative to the classic sweeteners like Equal, Sweet & Low, etc & they seem to be a solid substitute. Basically there are pros & cons to both; you have to do some research, monitor how your system responds & make an educated decision from there.

Tony

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/artificial-sweeteners/MY00073
http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/subjects/s/sweeteners_artificial/index.html
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/artificial-sweeteners
http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/LabelClaims/HealthClaimsMeetingSignificantScientificAgreementSSA/ucm074135.htm
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/questions/carbohydrate-question/index.html#sugar-alcohol
http://www.googlesyndicatedsearch.com/u/CSPI?pg=aq&what=web&sa=web&domains=cspinet.org&sitesearch=www.cspinet.org&q=Sweeteners&x=9&y=9

Trainer
Tony Nicholson 136k
4 years ago
1

Hi Erica,

In my opinion, it's still too soon to tell. We can think that any new product is 100% safe, but until we have years of evidence and multiple studies done on a truly random demographic of people, we can't be sure. There are some studies that have shown that Truvia was harmful to lab animals. Some studies show that to be true for aspartame as well. I would gather that the use of Truvia would be comparable to Sweet n Low. Moderation is key here, just like with everything else in life Wink

Debs

Developer
Debbie Pias 57k
4 years ago
1

In order for it to have the negative effects you hear about, you'd have to consume a completely unreasonable amount.

"Aspartame began appearing in foods and beverages after 1976, when the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved aspartame for table use and as an ingredient in some dry foods [O'Brien and Gelardi, 1991]. Along with this acceptance, the FDA set an acceptable daily intake (ADI) level in order to help prevent people from consuming too much of the sweetener. The level that the FDA set is 50 mg-aspartame/kg body weight, which is an extremely large amount for humans to consume. For example, a 150-pound person must consume 97 packets of dry sweetener, or 19 cans of diet soft drink, in one day to reach this level, while a 200-pound person must consume 130 packets, or 25 cans. It is almost impossible for a person to consume this much aspartame, even if he or she consumes several different products. A 150-pound person would need to drink a 12-pack of diet soft drink and eat 5 gelatin desserts, 6 bowls of cereal, and 4 servings of yogurt in one day to reach the ADI level."

http://tc.engr.wisc.edu/uer/uer98/author2/content.html

That said, natural is always better and I am not familiar with Truvia. I dont go out of my way to consume aspartame, but I like diet soda and dont worry about it since its such a small amount. A "normal" amount of aspartame isnt going to register (assuming you are healthy and not genetically predisposed to seizures, those are the people that have issues with aspartame). As Debbie said above, practice moderation and sense, and you'll be fineHappy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17828671
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12180494
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11754527
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15510910

Matt Lathrop 26k
4 years ago
1

Sweet & Low doesn't contain Aspertame-- Equal does. Sweet & Low is sacchrine-- and there hasn't really been a food additive that has been more historically studied.

Not unlike the dosage of Aspertame Matt identifies above, it would take an awful lot of sacchrine to reach toxic levels as well. Splenda is sucralose-- and the last I saw said something like 32000 packets a day were the toxicity level. Who can afford that?Wink

Seriously though, Truvia is of the Stevia plant-- and not extracted traditionally with chemicals (sucralose is extracted by introducing chlorine to the sugar crystals)-- and is "considered" safer because it is more natural-- then again, Anthrax is natural too.Wink

Whichever artificial sweetner, or brand of Stevia, or Honey, Agave Syrup or (gasp) sugar you choose-- moderation is best in all of it.

Vicki Bowland 53k
4 years ago
0

Thanks for your help everyone! ACTUALLY, I do not eat/ intake any of the above mentioned sugars. (Can't stand the taste of sweet n low or equal, and have nothing to put truvia on!) I do not intake sodas anymore, and have cut my sweet tea down to one a week (Grandma's After Church dinnerGrin ) I was just curious because in the near future the hubs and I are discussing children.. of whom I'm sure will eat loads of sugar..but I'm researching to find the pros and cons of all of it.

QUESTION: Is Corn Syrup really that bad.. I mean..it is made of CORN... all those darn commericals are wayyy to confusing. It's like watching the Government battle..well..themselves. Any ideas guys? Thanks!!!

Erica

Erica Crooks 90
4 years ago
0

Yeah corn syrup is really that bad. Trust me when I say the research & the published information is mixed & will vary, but at the end of the day, unbiased health experts who are agenda free & I’ll leave it at that, state that one of our (health conscience adults & children) main goals is or should be to reduce & avoid foods & substances that have high levels of solid fats & added sugars or the “empty calories”, like, but not limited to, corn syrups.

Corn syrup is linked to & the most commonly added sweetener in processed foods & beverages (Mayo Clinic). There is a a lot of crap in those processed foods that are extremely unhealthy for you, but I strongly feel as if the corn syrup is one of the biggest culprits & is directly tied to weight gain, dental cavities, poor nutrition & increased triglyceride levels which can increase your chances of heart risk (Mayo Clinic stats).

At the end of the day for you & your future kid’s sake, you may want to sit down with a certified dietician & get some more in-depth detail regarding how some of these things may adversely affect you along with discussing some healthy alternatives & options. We did & it was well worth it.

Tony

Trainer
Tony Nicholson 136k
4 years ago

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Erica Crooks member since Sep '11

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MemberClemson, SC
9/14/2011 at 12:46 PM
Nutrition
Food Labeling
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