angry and moody after working out?
0

I work out doing a circuit training that last from 30 - 50 minutes depending on if it is legs, chest/arms and back/shoulders. Then another 30 -50 minutes of cardio (this I vary from running (treadmill or outside), elliptical, bicycle, or walking). I typically eat light before going to the gym and have a protein drink immediately afterwards. I also take a multivitamin daily.

The problem is I have notice I have a short fuse. It seems like the simplest things can set me off. I get angry and I feel depressed. I feel feel my patience is almost just as short with my family. I'm trying to get in shape and loss weight, which I have been very succesfull so far. Started at 230 down to 210.

11 answers

sort by:
3

Sometimes life is just full of stresses and we all cope with it in different ways. Exercise typically helps lower stress levels because our bodies produce our natural 'feel good hormones' as a response to exercise. These endorphins often elevate our moods and gives us a natural 'high'. For some people the response is greater than others and it is what the term 'runners high' relates to. So having said all that, I think you could try just trying to relax and enjoy the bodies 'high' it gives you after you exercise, perhaps try and dedicate half an hour or so after your workout just to you and don't think of the outside world and all its troubles. I appreciate if you have a busy schedule this may not be realistic, but at least try and relax yourself when you get in the car and drive home from your workout.

The only comment I might make on exercise possibly having a negative effect on mood, is that depending on the type of workout you do (typically a heavy weights session - NOT so much a circuit session), your body does produce more testosterone (regardless of gender, just obviously not as much for females) and more Growth Hormone. Again this is a response to exercise. Now it is a MYTH that testosterone alone makes you 'angry', or it changes your personality. What it does is it brings out your 'survival instincts' (primitive human type behaviors) and if you are predisposed to being easily irritated, moody or angry then it may bring this out more in you, but it does NOT make you angry if you do not have this predisposition. I hope I have not confused you but I just wanted to give you some ideas.

James


4 years ago
1

great work, you might be stressed out and trying to do too much? Take a look at your schedule and take it down a notch, you may not be getting the rest or stress less time you need. I've always been an angry person quite honestly and until going to the doctor last year I didn't realize how it effected my relationships and my health. Has anything else changed, new meds, anything? Usually something triggers this...

Andrea Holden 9.1k
4 years ago
1

Maybe eliminate gluten from your diet? Also dairy. Worked for me.


3 years ago
0

I get angry after working out, and have been feeling that way for 20 years. I think that it is blood sugar or something. I was looking for an answer on this and other websites, but it definitely has nothing to do with what is going on in my life outside of exercise. It's definitely chemical, but I eat dinner after working out and I have the same feeling whether I eat carbs, protien or anything else. It also causes me to not sleep. I take vitamins in the morning and usually don't take any other supplements or protien shakes, so would someone with real medical knowledge please tell me what the deal is!

groucho 10
3 years ago
0

Let me lend a professional opinion here. I don't come out of my shell much personally, but my Masters is in Social & Behavioral Sciences that makes me do this.

It doesn't seem to me with the limited information you gave suggests that your depression is connected with fitness or workouts. While you have a "short fuse", that doesn't suggest that your fitness goals are in question. It just says that you get pissed off easily. You are not alone.

A realistic event happens when one adjusts any change. So, if you are doing good on your "consumptive profile" (note: I don't use the word diet), then you might think you are depriving yourself. If that is the case, then try to focus on something you like that isn't so depriving.

Jonny Quest 5.2k
3 years ago
0

I used to be like that and the thing is, you can't be mood affects your weight loss tremendously because as you stress so does your body and then the lbs stay on. I realized that my mood had alot to do with what I was fueling my body with. What are you eating? What is your light snack before the gym? What do you eat afterward. Maybe take a look at your diet. Also, working out does suck, not matter what people say! You are doing a great job and keep that in mind. The only way you can lose your weight and meet your goals is maintain a positive attitude. Try to think picture the body you are working towards hopefully your attitude will change as more weight comes off. Goodluck!

ldigiovanni21 3.2k
3 years ago
0

My personal opinion is that you may be hypoglycemic and lose a lot of blood sugar while working out. Try a protein shake or eating a piece of fruit and rehydrating with a sports drink.

hongemort 10
3 years ago
0

Are you getting enough calories? I know when mine dip too low for too long, I experience the same irritability and my mood goes in the tank. I am pretty busy these days so I have be sure to eat enough when I do get a chance to eat. Just something to think about along with the great advice already posted.

Matt Lathrop 26k
3 years ago
0

Have you removed anything from your intake lately?

I know a lot of times when people make changes with their diet, or lifestyle changes in general, we are resistant to the change (as is human nature) and even if we don't realize it on a conscious level, that resistance can come in a number of ways, sometimes subconsciously. Maybe the body is uncomfortable because it is being taken outside of its regular comfort zone, and is trying to resist by irritating the mind as everything is connected and both influence each other..and if that's case, then I think the adaptation process will make those feelings lessen a little with each workout. I would be surprised if this was something that continued though with consistent workouts. Stick with it for a little while longer and see if there are changes.

I know for me, I rarely feel as good as I do after a really intense workout. I feel great physically because of the workout, but I also feel great mentally because I know I gave full effort and didn't leave much, if anything left in the tank. If I do quite a rep early, or feel like I didn't squeeze the full potential out of the workout, I will definitely have regret, and try and make up for it on the next repetition, set, etc. So it could also be possible that you are feeling guilty that you had a little left in the tank, and didn't empty it before leaving-if that's the case guilt can be a great asset for a good workout.

But often times, the answer is a simple one, and I know when I start to get irritable, the first place I look is to when the last time I eat was, and it usually becomes evident it has been quite a few hours.

Nick Flit 63k
3 years ago
0

Make sure you are getting enough sleep. My husband works the graveyard shift (midnight to 8 am) and goes to the gym when he gets off work. He's tired, grouchy, hungry (but doesn't like to eat before he works out), so he's not in a great mood after the gym. On his days off, when he gets a good night's sleep and then we go in the morning, it's much better.

purrsnikitty 9.2k
3 years ago

add your answer!

ifdlt306 member since Nov '10

reputation
13k

MemberIndianola, IA
9/9/2011 at 2:53 PM
Weight Loss
Mental Health
Nutrition