i workout regularly and i eat healthy, so why isn't the scale moving?
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I am about 40lbs overweight and I've been going to the gym faithfully everyday. I do 1 hour of cardio every other day in between I do 30 min. cardio and 30 min. doing, squats, crunches, and weights. I eat healthy but i'm not a big fan of breakfast. My problem is I still have not seen any results on the scale. Am I expecting to much to soon or am I doing something wrong? ARG!

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How long have you been on this routine? Keep in mind the scale can lie. The important thing is to change your body composition. You may be adding some muscle which is denser and weighs more than fat causing you to lose inches but you may not notice much difference on the scale. Personally I rarely weigh myself and go more by how I feel and how my clothes are fitting. You talk a little about your diet and say you're not a big fan of breakfast. Try to get something for breakfast to get that metabolism cranking. I know it's kind of a cop out to say consult a personal trainer but have you talked to a trainer at your club?

Mike Kaliban 1.1k
4 years ago
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eating 6 smaller meals a day is super important and you should never skip breakfast.
After I started doing this, my energy level increased and I started to lean up.
you can build a daily diet plan with the tracker device under the nutrition button.
make sure to get more protien, smarter carbs and smaller portions.
watch out for the snacking. that used to kill my workout efforts.
I'm just learning this but it makes a huge difference.
I feel and look different in under 2 weeks. I wish I would have done this sooner.
I also booked a session with a trainer at my club. He was really helpful.
Don't give up-- get better!

Dbond 504
4 years ago
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This is from an article I wrote a long time ago, and it explains some of the physiology at work when someone starts an exercise program. There are several reasons why the scale doesn't move much...at least initially. The message here is to keep at it, and definitely monitor the intake side of the equation.

When a sedentary or somewhat inactive individual starts an exercise program, several changes occur in the body to respond to this new exercise stimulus. The sum of these changes can add a bit to the scale, despite your hopes for the exact opposite. First of all, the muscles can increase in size, and the added protein in the muscle actually stores additional water. The body will also start to store more sugar in the muscles, and again, water storage plays a role here as well. Several enzymes that process oxygen will also increase in quantity within the muscle cells. And if this isn’t enough, your connective tissues will toughen and thicken, and your total blood volume can increase by up to one pound within a week. All of this better prepares your body for more frequent exercise bouts, and helps to improve your workout efficiency. At this point, you’re probably wondering what can be done to mitigate these effects? The answer is not much. The key is to be consistent with your workouts, and avoid the scale if you’re likely to get discouraged by what you see. It’s important to remember that this is simply your body adapting to exercise. Believe me, your weight will trend down in the long run as you continue your program. Don’t forget the old adage—good things come to those who wait!!

Thanks,

Brian

Brian Zehetner 36k
4 years ago

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tashgodin member since May '10

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MemberAuburn, MA
6/4/2010 at 12:32 PM
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